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Banner Year for Crabgrass and more: Turf Talk Podcast Week 17

  • August 8, 2018 — Banner year for crabgrass. Bermudagrass in Brooklyn. Root issues worsen.

Turf Talk is a weekly podcast during the growing season hosted by ‘Turf Guy’ Frank Rossi, associate professor, Horticulture Section, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, and turfgrass Extension Aide, Carl Schimenti.

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Surface Hardness Response to Localized Decompaction

Clegg impact tester

Clegg impact tester

Summary of new research by Christopher Sitko, Joshua Fontaine, Carl Schimenti, Frank Rossi documents how you can keep playing fields safe by reducing surface hardness:

Data-Driven Natural Grass Athletic Field Management: Surface Hardness Response to Localized Decompaction

High-performance athletic surfaces can benefit from a data-driven approach to management that increases field safety and performance by adding precision. Data-driven management of natural grass athletic fields adheres to playing surface quality and safety performance guidelines established by the Australian Sports Turf Institute for cool-season natural grass athletic fields. High quality athletic fields should inherently be safe for play. Surface hardness is a primary measure of field quality and safety and should be maintained to provide desirable ball-surface interaction and limit risk of head injury. Surface hardness is measured using the standard three-drop method with a Clegg Impact Tester. A weighted missile is released from a uniform height and measures the change in acceleration at surface impact.

The Cornell University Turfgrass Program has worked closely with Cornell Athletics to train students interested in working in the the sports turf industry. A recent student project monitored surface hardness weekly during the 2018 Spring/Summer playing seasons. Measurements indicated a localized area of surface hardness where readings exceeded head-injury threshold levels. Therefore, a localized decompaction system was implemented using a Toro 648 Procore fitted with ¾’’ solid tines followed by topdressing sand that filled open channels using a Dakota 310 Turf Tender. High quality topdressing material is important and should reflect the surface modification goals. This application used a clean, uniformly graded sand consisting of particles in the medium and coarse size fractions. The uniformity coefficient (Cu) of the topdressing sand tested at 2.5. The lower the Cu, the more uniform the particle size and the greater the compaction resistance.

Toro 648 Procore fitted with ¾’’ solid tines used to alleviate compaction

Toro 648 Procore fitted with ¾’’ solid tines used to alleviate compaction

Applying sand topdressing with Dakota 310 Turf Tender.

Applying sand topdressing with Dakota 310 Turf Tender.

Measurements were taken before, during and after the decompaction process. Before decompaction, 10 of 12 measurements collected from localized areas totaling 7500 sq ft had surface hardness readings above head-injury thresholds of 120 gravities.

graph

Click for larger view

Following decompaction all 12 measurements were reduced on average by 30 percent and fell within the preferred range for safe play. Furthermore, the standard deviation (differences among initial measures) dropped by 40%, indicating a more consistent playing surface following decompaction.

This project demonstrates how high-performance athletic surfaces can benefit from a data-driven approach to management that increases field safety and performance by adding precision.

This work was conducted by our 2018 Sports Turf Research Intern, Rhys Moeller (former Varsity Soccer player for Cornell University), Josh Fontaine Sports Turf Field Research Manager, Chris Sitko Sports Turf Graduate Research Assistant, Carl Schimenti Cornell Turfgrass Program Manager and Frank Rossi, Cornell Turfgrass Program Leader.

Cornell University ShortCUTT Newsletter (Week 15 – July 30, 2018)

ShortCUTT Newsletter (Week 15  – July 30)

Chinch bugs, cytokinins, join us for our next Walk and Talk hosted by WNYGCSA in Fall.

As always, please don’t hesitate to contact Carl Schimenti (css223@cornell.edu) if you have questions you would like to see answered in the ShortCUTT newsletter!

Please feel free to share our weekly ShortCUTT editions with anyone! We post them freely on our website so you can view back issues as well.

Pests, weeds and stress: Turf Talk Podcast Week 16

  • July 31, 2018 — Pests, weeds and stress: Chinch bugs, clover, cyanobacteria, root pathogens and more.

Turf Talk is a weekly podcast during the growing season hosted by ‘Turf Guy’ Frank Rossi, associate professor, Horticulture Section, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, and turfgrass Extension Aide, Carl Schimenti.

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Excess moisture fueling stress, hindering recovery: Turf Talk Podcast Week 15

  • July 25, 2018 — Excess moisture fueling stress, hindering recovery.

Turf Talk is a weekly podcast during the growing season hosted by ‘Turf Guy’ Frank Rossi, associate professor, Horticulture Section, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, and turfgrass Extension Aide, Carl Schimenti.

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Cornell University ShortCUTT Newsletter (Week 14 – July 23, 2018)

ShortCUTT Newsletter (Week 14  – July 23)

Excess moisture fueling stress, hindering recovery. Water deep to enhance fertilizer effectiveness and seed germination.

As always, please don’t hesitate to contact Carl Schimenti (css223@cornell.edu) if you have questions you would like to see answered in the ShortCUTT newsletter!

Please feel free to share our weekly ShortCUTT editions with anyone! We post them freely on our website so you can view back issues as well.

Disease issues with guest Rich Buckley, Rutgers Plant Diagnostic Lab: Turf Talk Podcast Week 14

  • July 18, 2018 — Turf guy Frank Rossi chats disease issues with Rich Buckley, director of the Plant Diagnostic Laboratory at Rutgers University.

Turf Talk is a weekly podcast during the growing season hosted by ‘Turf Guy’ Frank Rossi, associate professor, Horticulture Section, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, and turfgrass Extension Aide, Carl Schimenti.

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Summer stress underway, fueling pests, diseases. Slow down on mowing: Turf Talk Podcast Week 13

  • July 11, 2018 — Summer stress underway, fueling plethora of pests, diseases. Slow down on mowing, increase rolling.

Turf Talk is a weekly podcast during the growing season hosted by ‘Turf Guy’ Frank Rossi, associate professor, Horticulture Section, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, and turfgrass Extension Aide, Carl Schimenti.

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Cornell University ShortCUTT Newsletter (Week 13 – July 9, 2018)

ShortCUTT Newsletter (Week 13  – July 9)

Mower set up to reduce turf stress. Clover, grubs and pollinators.

As always, please don’t hesitate to contact Carl Schimenti (css223@cornell.edu) if you have questions you would like to see answered in the ShortCUTT newsletter!

Please feel free to share our weekly ShortCUTT editions with anyone! We post them freely on our website so you can view back issues as well.

Abiotic stress pythium and hot weather water management: Turf Talk Podcast Week 12

  • July 4, 2018 — Weather fueling abiotic stress and disease, especially pythium. Hot weather water management.

Turf Talk is a weekly podcast during the growing season hosted by ‘Turf Guy’ Frank Rossi, associate professor, Horticulture Section, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, and turfgrass Extension Aide, Carl Schimenti.

More episodes.

Subscribe (free):

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